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SCIENCE ON

After 3.5-4 days of no science due to what we called, the Big Red Blob (aka 6-7m swells), we are back on shifts and doing science again. Finally!

We are currently collecting seismic reflection data off the east coast of The North Island of New Zealand, offshore of the Gisborne area. We have completed 3 lines, and we are about to start our 4th as I write this blog. The surveys are high-resolution, which means we are looking at structures immediately below the seafloor sediments. The array consists of 48-channels ~12.5 meters (8 channels/100m section), where the total length of the seismic line behind the boat is ~700m. There are two air guns that trigger every 20 seconds while we transit (in a straight line) across the desired area. During the day this can be tricky because of marine mammals, specifically pilot whales. There are “observers” that keep an eye out for the whales, and if they are seen the air guns are immediately shut down until we pass them or they decide to leave the area. This survey should take ~3 days, and then we will start heat flow experiments again.

A few interesting features we hope to get a better look at with the seismic surveys:

  • Gisborne Knolls
  • the deformation front
  • seamounts
  • landslide-like features
  • splay faults

Seismic line being tested on the deck of the R/V Revelle
Seismic line being tested on the deck of the R/V Revelle
Seismic line on the roll
Seismic line on the roll
Seismic line going back onto the roll after testing
Seismic line going back onto the roll after testing
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